(no subject)

Erin Forman
3-8-05
Block D
Hamlet Essay

One critic makes the case that Claudius is “clearly the superior of” Hamlet when it comes to morality. Claudius is said to have a “much more intelligent sense of personal responsibility and […] his own sinfulness.” However, it is easy to contest that Hamlet is a more “moral creature”.
In act 3 scene 3, King Claudius begins to pray. Hamlet walks in and thinks that King Claudius is praying for forgiveness, but when he rises from his prayers, he reveals that he is not sorry, “word without thoughts never to heaven go”. (99) King Claudius wishes he could be sorry, but he’s come to realize that his heart is not in it, making him the less “moral creature”. Claudius deserves a harsher punishment because Hamlet’s actions were driven by his insaneness. Claudius had a plan all along. After the death of his father, Hamlet wanted to go back to school in Wittenberg, but Claudius refused to let him go in the event that King Claudius could actually kill Hamlet. This is also after he murdered Hamlet’s father so that Claudius could marry Queen Gertrude and become king. Greed is what drove Claudius to do what he did.

As defined in the English dictionary, greed is an excessive desire to acquire or possess more than one needs or deserves. This definition truly defines King Claudius because all along, he planned to kill young Hamlet. If King Claudius was smart, he would have let Hamlet go back to school in Wittenberg when he asked to go. Instead, King Claudius refused to let him go, “For your intent in going back to school in Wittenberg, it is most retrograde to our desire.” (1.2.112-114) It would have been smart of King Claudius to let young Hamlet go back to school, because that way he would have not been around to wonder about his father’s death and

(no subject)

Erin Forman
3-8-05
Block D
Hamlet Essay

One critic makes the case that Claudius is “clearly the superior of” Hamlet when it comes to morality. Claudius is said to have a “much more intelligent sense of personal responsibility and […] his own sinfulness.” However, it is easy to contest that Hamlet is a more “moral creature”.
In act 3 scene 3, King Claudius begins to pray. Hamlet walks in and thinks that King Claudius is praying for forgiveness, but when he rises from his prayers, he reveals that he is not sorry, “word without thoughts never to heaven go”. (99) King Claudius wishes he could be sorry, but he’s come to realize that his heart is not in it, making him the less “moral creature”. Claudius deserves a harsher punishment because Hamlet’s actions were driven by his insaneness. Claudius had a plan all along. After the death of his father, Hamlet wanted to go back to school in Wittenberg, but Claudius refused to let him go in the event that King Claudius could actually kill Hamlet. This is also after he murdered Hamlet’s father so that Claudius could marry Queen Gertrude and become king. Greed is what drove Claudius to do what he did.

As defined in the English dictionary, greed is an excessive desire to acquire or possess more than one needs or deserves. This definition truly defines King Claudius because all along, he planned to kill Hamlet. If King Claudius was smart, he would have let Hamlet go back to school in Wittenberg when he asked to go. Instead, King Claudius refused to let him go, “For your intent in going back to school in Wittenberg, it is most retrograde to our desire.” (1.2.112-114)

Throughout the play, Hamlet subtly hints that he is crazy. A response from his acquaintance, Polonius, suggests that his actions are in fact brought on by his insanity; “Indeed that’s out of the air, how pregnant sometimes his [Hamlet] replies are.” (2.2.211)

(no subject)

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